How to Follow Your Customers

 

In Customer Service and Sales, I believe there are 4 distinct Types of Personalities.  In previous Posts we have talked about being yourself, or more correctly, being your many selves.  We also know that customers can present themselves in many different personas, and that you also have many different personas.  It is now time to talk about the third personality type, the Follower. 

Followers are people who build the transactions on the basis of Process.  They are systemic people who love to be organised.  If you’re a Follower, you may feel like this often, or occasionally

Follower is not a derogatory term, nor a term to be confused with lack of leadership qualities.  A follower is a person who follows process.  They speak the language of systems.  If you are a follower, the following statements describe you.

 • You quote data

• Don’t like sloppiness

• You love process and structure – you’re systemic

• You want to know the fine print

• You will keep asking questions

• You respect polish and perfection

• Will be convinced if process is followed, but also great at finding loopholes

• Leave nothing to chance

• You quote dates and amounts

• Love detail – they give you comfort

  Key – Transactions are built on the process

  Example – Accountant

In a customer Service, or Sales environment, if you are one of these people – as the server, then be careful of someone who likes a more direct approach - a Pounder.  You will seem bureaucratic and inflexible.  If however, as the server/salesperson, you are dealing with another Follower, then Follow.

 It is the servers responsibility to match the customer, not the other way around.

 Also See Post on Pounders

Also See Post on Nurturers

Also see Post called Always be Yourself? What BS

 

How to Follow Your Customers from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

Do your Customers Want to Nurture You?


In Customer Service and Sales, I believe there are 4 distinct Types of Personalities.  

In previous Posts we have talked about being yourself, or more correctly, being your many selves.  We also know that customers can present themselves in many different personas, and that you also have many different personas.  It is now time to talk about the second personality type, the Nurturer. 

Nurturers are people who build the transactions on relationships.  They are empathetic people who love to be social.  If you’re a nurturer, the following statements sounds creepily descriptive.  You may feel like this often, or occasionally

  • You love people – hate confrontation
  • Some people consider you submissive
  • You love a chat and ask about how people are feeling
  • You don’t respond well to pressure
  • You will change the subject if it’s uncomfortable
  • Do not jump to conclusions, you will discuss all options
  • Do not let your feelings be known – they are hard to read
  • Always the same friendly exterior
  • You are more likely to be convinced if you ‘like’ someone.

Key – Transactions are built on relationships

Example – Social worker

In a customer Service, or Sales environment, if you are one of these people – as the server, then be careful of someone who likes a more direct approach - a Pounder.  You will seem hard to tie down, soft and indecisive.  If however, as the server/salesperson, you are dealing with another Nurturer, then Nurture away.

It is the servers responsibility to match the customer, not the other way around.

Also See Post on Pounders

Also see Post called Always be Yourself? What BS

<p><a href="">Do your Customers Want to Nurture You?</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/stevendipietro">Steven Di Pietro</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

When are you a Pounder?

In Customer Service and Sales, I believe there are 4 distinct Types of Personalities.  

In previous Posts we have talked about being yourself, or more correctly, being your many selves.  We also know that customers can present themselves in many different personas, and that you also have many different personas.  It is now time to talk about the first personality type, the Pounder. 

The Pounder can be categorised as follows:

You’re always rushing

No patience

You communicate efficiently – straight to the point

Driven by results, not processes or relationships

You value knowledge and smarts

You apply pressure to get your way

You don’t mix business with pleasure

You’re not interested in relationships

Cannot stand fools

Will be convinced by knowledge and efficiency

You can seem hot tempered and animated

You’re quick to show your emotions – you tell it ‘as it is’

Key – Transactions are built on results before relationships


Example – Hard-nosed construction manager


In a customer Service, or Sales environment, if you are one of these people – as the server, then be careful of someone who likes a more ‘social approach’.  You will seem abrupt, or arrogant.  If however, as the server/salesperson, you are dealing with another Pounder, then Pound away.

You can’t always be yourself.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

When are you a Pounder? from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

One Big Danger of Customer Sales Forms

In my Mystery Shopping business, I see many examples of Sales forms and processes designed to keep staff on-track with the Sales process.
The form may look like a script, a form, or even a set process.

Sales forms have their place, however the biggest danger is that you lose sight of the customer, and do not hear what they have to say.
This happens often in complex transactions such as a loan enquiry or a car purchase.  The staff member goes through the motions and doesn't hear the customer.  They either:
  1. try to sell everything at once (insurances, overdraft, loan and credit card),
  2. close the sale too quickly, or
  3. close the sale too late.
The customer often walks out confused because their initial question/query didn't get answered.

Use the forms by all means, but leave the humanity of the Server to connect with the other human being.  

The server is not there to complete a form, but to complete a sale.

How easily do you lose focus?

<p><a href="">One Big Danger of Customer Sales Forms</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/stevendipietro">Steven Di Pietro</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

Always Be yourself? What BS

Always be yourself?  What BS.

Which self are we talking about?  We all have different personalities.  A tough boss at work might be a meek servant at home.  You might be calm one minute, and impatient the next.  You can flip in a second.

A footballer in a crowded room can go from talking macho to his friends (grunting and ignoring vowels), to a kneeling high pitched slow talker while talking to a young child, to a polite and upstanding member of the community when talking to their girlfriend’s parents.  All these personas can present themselves in the blink of an eye.

Be yourself?  Which self?

So as a server/seller, you have those multiple personas, and the customer had the same.  Just as a footballer might instinctively ‘work the crowd’ the trick is to match the customer’s persona.

There are many personality profiling tools available, however I believe there are 4 distinct personality types which appear in a service/sales environment.  These could be expanded to be 40, or 400 types, but the point is to recognize that not only are people different, but they can present differently.

Can you imagine yourself being any of these personalities?  Perhaps one dominates, but at times you may fluctuate between them all.

Pounder – Where the transaction is driven by numbers and necessity.

Nurturer – Where the relationship is more important than the transaction.

Follower – Adherence to process is the most important aspect of a transaction.

Independent – Transactions are built on feelings and impression.

The same customer can present these different personalities with every visit.  The server must be aware, and change accordingly – to match the personality style.

 

Be Yourself? What BS from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

Be Yourself? What BS from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose