Entries in customer service (24)

Why do your customers 'really' leave

Why do customers really leave? 
Dan Kennedy - the "Sovereign of Sales Letters" thinks it not as obvious as we might think.  I'd tend to agree.
Customer leave for one of the following reasons:
  • 1% die. There’s not much we can do about this one.
  • 3% move. Offline, this is due to geography; online, it’s due to shifting interests. You must do all you can to hold the attention of your audience. Some loss is acceptable over time, but stay remarkable and you will minimize the losses.
  • 5% switch to something else due to a friend’s recommendation. There is no more valuable referral than that from a friend. Yet, if your customer is truly happy with your product or services, the odds of them leaving are slim.
  • 9% switch to a better product or service. The best way to fight this is to make sure your products, services, and offers are simply the best around.
  • 14% leave for general dissatisfaction. Again, it’s a good idea to trim the tribe, as you’re never going to please everyone. However, if a customer leaves, make sure you did everything within reason to keep them.

All together, those five reasons only add up to 32%. A staggering 68% of customer loss is due to indifference.

If I don't like a service, I don't argue, I don't make a scene, I don't tell them how to fix it.  I just don't go back.

Indifference kills loyalty.

Here are 3 simply ways to stay relevant.

 

  1. Don't wait for complaints, or compliments to act.
  2. Change it up - change the interaction in simple ways.  Give the customer small surprises (eg occasionally upgrade a frequent flyer to business class).
  3. Keep it the same  - Don't underestimate constant delivery.  Delivering exactly what the customer wants, every time, will help you stand out.

 

 

How to Follow Your Customers

 

In Customer Service and Sales, I believe there are 4 distinct Types of Personalities.  In previous Posts we have talked about being yourself, or more correctly, being your many selves.  We also know that customers can present themselves in many different personas, and that you also have many different personas.  It is now time to talk about the third personality type, the Follower. 

Followers are people who build the transactions on the basis of Process.  They are systemic people who love to be organised.  If you’re a Follower, you may feel like this often, or occasionally

Follower is not a derogatory term, nor a term to be confused with lack of leadership qualities.  A follower is a person who follows process.  They speak the language of systems.  If you are a follower, the following statements describe you.

 • You quote data

• Don’t like sloppiness

• You love process and structure – you’re systemic

• You want to know the fine print

• You will keep asking questions

• You respect polish and perfection

• Will be convinced if process is followed, but also great at finding loopholes

• Leave nothing to chance

• You quote dates and amounts

• Love detail – they give you comfort

  Key – Transactions are built on the process

  Example – Accountant

In a customer Service, or Sales environment, if you are one of these people – as the server, then be careful of someone who likes a more direct approach - a Pounder.  You will seem bureaucratic and inflexible.  If however, as the server/salesperson, you are dealing with another Follower, then Follow.

 It is the servers responsibility to match the customer, not the other way around.

 Also See Post on Pounders

Also See Post on Nurturers

Also see Post called Always be Yourself? What BS

 

How to Follow Your Customers from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

When are you a Pounder?

In Customer Service and Sales, I believe there are 4 distinct Types of Personalities.  

In previous Posts we have talked about being yourself, or more correctly, being your many selves.  We also know that customers can present themselves in many different personas, and that you also have many different personas.  It is now time to talk about the first personality type, the Pounder. 

The Pounder can be categorised as follows:

You’re always rushing

No patience

You communicate efficiently – straight to the point

Driven by results, not processes or relationships

You value knowledge and smarts

You apply pressure to get your way

You don’t mix business with pleasure

You’re not interested in relationships

Cannot stand fools

Will be convinced by knowledge and efficiency

You can seem hot tempered and animated

You’re quick to show your emotions – you tell it ‘as it is’

Key – Transactions are built on results before relationships


Example – Hard-nosed construction manager


In a customer Service, or Sales environment, if you are one of these people – as the server, then be careful of someone who likes a more ‘social approach’.  You will seem abrupt, or arrogant.  If however, as the server/salesperson, you are dealing with another Pounder, then Pound away.

You can’t always be yourself.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

When are you a Pounder? from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

What is Service with Purpose? (with Video)

A transaction occurs when the needs and wants are met.  Great service happens when there is a meeting of minds.

Service with Purpose as a methodology, but also, as an attitude.

It is about understanding each separately, then what happens when they are combined.

Service is a matching process of stuff (needs and wants) as well as personalities.

The 'stuff' includes the widget, distribution, delivery and price.  These must be matched to the Customer's needs and wants.

After the offer is matched, the personalities must match.  The matching of personalities requires staff engagement, which ultimately results in customer engagement - and great Service with Purpose.

 

 

Service with Purpose from Steven Di Pietro on Vimeo.

Posted via email from Service with Purpose

How Important is Service - Really, How Important?

A timely reminder of the importance of Service.


In July 2005 Service Integrity conducted a study to determine the importance of Customer Service to customers. The survey asked the following paired questions with 324 respondents

Which is more important?

Store Presentation 8%
Service 92%

and yet stores can easily spend USD500,000 on a single store fitout but begrudge spending USD50 per month on Mystery Shopping

Store Location 22%
Service 78%

Cleanliness 47%
Service 53%

Staff knowledge 59%
Service 41%

Location 42%
Presentation 58%

Staff knowledge 87%
Presentation 13%

Cleanliness 41%
Staff knowledge 59%


Time to rethink a few priorities in these tough times.